Surrey Poetry Festival 2018

Full line-up now confirmed…

Clémentine Bedos is a multidisciplinary artist whose recent shows include a solo exhibition at the Constance Howard Gallery, London ‘Contagious Hystories’. Currently exploring themes of identity, binaries and the Other. https://www.clementinebedos.com/

Emma Bennett’s recent performances include durational piano pieces, an exploration of pining for soft things, and interpreting the words of birdsong. https://emmabennettperformance.wordpress.com/

Emma Cocker is a writer-artist whose work explores the slippage between writing on page, to performance in time, between still and moving image, between individual and collective action. http://not-yet-there.blogspot.co.uk/

Rebecca Cremin draws on traditions of live art, Fluxus, performance writing and site-specific work using language as an object to expose, to investigate, to locate. http://www.veerbooks.com/Rebecca-Cremin-LAY-D

Amy Cutler is a multi-disciplinary practitioner with a special interest in geohumanities – the engagement between geography and arts/humanities. https://amycutler.net/

Tina Darragh is one of the original members of the Language group of poets. Her work explores class, race and ecology. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tina_Darragh

Rob Holloway is currently exploring sonnets and prose poems, and has been a DJ on Resonance FM. https://vimeo.com/9383523

P. Inman is associated with language and minimalist poetry. His work has been described as ‘thick with meanings that never quite complete themselves; full of social ironies and a sly and biting humor’ http://writing.upenn.edu/epc/authors/inman/

Peter Jaeger will perform a durational version of his latest book Midamble, on the lawn at G Live. The book concerns his recently completed walk on the Camino de Santiago de Compostela. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jG1EUZusDTY

Sharon Kivland is an artist who has recently been called a poet, five times, to her surprise. Her work considers what is put at stake by art, politics, and psychoanalysis.  http://www.sharonkivland.com/

Lila Matsumoto’s poetry explores dailyness through allegory and literalness. http://www.shearsman.com/browse-poetry-books-by-author-Lila-Matsumoto

Tom Jenks is often verbivocovisual and always hilarious. https://www.zshboo.org/

Philip Terry uses Oulipian methods and translation to examine the crimes of bureaucracy and management. http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847772206

Scott Thurston’s current work responds to ongoing encounters with various dance and movement practices including Five Rhythms, Movement Medicine and Open Floor work. http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Thurston.php

Students from The University of Surrey have been exploring a range of poetic strategies during the workshop series Making Things Happen including the use of diaries, minimalism, Oulipo and collaboration.

Tickets go on sale April 4th – available from G-Live.

Running order TBC.

There will be a wine and cheese reception at 5pm.

An evening soiree takes place at 6.30, with the Poetry Festival joining The New Writer’s Festival (also taking place at G Live) and features a variety of readers including Tom Jenks.

Surrey Poetry Festival year 8 V2

New books from MA BIBLIOTHÈQUE

Paul BuckLibrary. A Suitable Case for Treatment

LIBRARY contains four essays and two interviews, with the pre-dominant concern of sexual questions: the subjects in art, film, and literature—the issues tied to Rivette’s La Belle Noiseuse, Madonna’s sexual assault in Dangerous Game, Clunie Reid’s use of language, Richard Prince’s obsession with books, and Paul Mayersberg’s articulation about sex.

Riccardo Boglione, It is Foul Weather in Us All

Riccardo Boglione sent copies of Shakespeare’s The Tempest to twelve artists living in Europe and America, each copy in the language of the country of residence of the artists, asking them to leave the book outside to the weather for as long as they wanted. The pages from those mistreated volumes reconstruct a Frankensteinian version of the play. In an extension of the metaphor of the tempest, the author gathers a small collection of injured volumes, mimicking Prospero’s book. Simultaneously he produces a version of Shakespeare’s play that shakes notions of authority (who is the real author? The invited artists? The English Bard? Boglione? The translators? Bad weather? Time?) and aesthetics (the ‘work’ of rain, snow, wind, and sun transformed the text’s characteristics, giving it a sculptural dimension that obfuscates its literary one). At stake once again, the perpetual dualisms: objects and words, nature and culture, Old and New World.

Kreider & O’LearyField Poetics

Field Poetics explores five different places, each with a story to tell, each with a unique mode, form, and vocal register through which to tell it. The writing journeys through a sequence of Andrei Tarkovsky’s ‘film images’, the multi-dimensional, interconnected space machine of the Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles, maritime pockets on the edge of the city of Lisbon, a history of silence and surveillance in a derelict wing of the Cork City Gaol, and the transposition of a centuries-old landscape aesthetic through video, performance, and pop in fourteen locations across the Kansai region of Japan. Sometimes documentation, sometimes score, and sometimes the work of a poet and an architect engaging with these sites, Field Poetics spins, suspends, and extends a relation to place.

In THE GOOD READER series:

Michael HamptonBeyond Walter Benjamin’s Paris & Kenneth Goldsmith’s New York

Why in our globalised twenty-first century the idea of a world capital city is passé. This essay examines the hypotheses promoted by Walter Benjamin’s Arcades Project and Kenneth Goldsmith’s response Capital: New York, capital of the 20th century, that Paris was the unofficial world capital city of the twentieth century—a mantle inherited by New York—and declares the model unfit for purpose in the twenty-first. Despite an apparent recrudescence of the nation state, the capital city as power base looks increasingly like a tribal relic, as digital technology rewires humans and our shared fate is thrown into stark relief by one ecological disaster after another. With the inexorable spread of the urban, pockets of sustainable business practice and hipster lifestyles suggest global capitalism is mutating from the inside, lured by the promise of an acephalic future.

An attractive pamphlet:

 The Desire for Haiku

Emma Bolland, Helen Clarke, Louise Finney, Sharon Kivland, Debbie Michaels, Bernadette O’Toole, Rachel Smith

For two years we have been reading The Preparation of the Novel by Roland Barthes, the collection of the series of lectures he gave at the Collège de France between 1978 and 1980, completed shortly before his death in 1981. He declared his intention to write a novel, and in this pedagogical experiment, explores the trial of novel writing. This year we are reading his lectures on his favourite literary form, the haiku, a poem of seventeen syllables in three lines of five, seven, five, usually containing a seasonal reference.  He confronts the problem of how to pass from Notation (of the Present), ‘a short fragmented form’, to the Novel, ‘a long continuous form’. For Barthes, the haiku is an ‘exemplary form of the Notation of the Present’, ‘a minimal act of enunciation’ that ‘notes […] a tiny element of “real”, present, concomitant life’.Our haikus are Barthes’s haikus, or rather, our haikus are constructed only of his words, extracted from the chapter entitled ‘The Desire for Haiku’, one from (or even for) each page. It is an experiment in writing, if not a search for a form (for thatis given), drawn from our more or less monthly meetings during the academic year around a table to talk about writing, the trial of writing, one that may show the rhythm of our reading. 

A charming booklet:

Sharon Kivland, Le Bottier de la Jeunesse

The above is from a series collecting and reframing found images that casts a rather unsavoury, even sinister gaze on a representation of childhood.

MA BIBLIOTHÈQUE BOOKS ARE AVAILABLE FROMhttp://lightsculpture.pagesperso-orange.fr/sharon/publications.html OR FROM ANAGRAMhttp://www.anagrambooks.com/

MA BIBLIOTHÈQUE will be at 

Miss Read, Haus der Kulteren der Welt, John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10,

10557 Berlin, from 4 to 6 May,

 and at OFF PRINT, Tate Modern, London, from 18 to 20 May

Hesterglock / Poem Brut @ SPIKE ISLAND

May 5: Hesterglock / Poem Brut @ SPIKE ISLAND
w/pop-up art exhibits, the making of a communal cut-up art poem, films, mass participation readings, interactions, performances, books for sale
with Sarer Scotthorne / Christian Patracchini / Isadora Vibes / David Turner / Vik Shirley / Peter Jaeger / Camilla Nelson / Clive Birnie / Lizzy Turner / Andrew Wells / Liz Zumin / Bob Modem

at Spike Island, 133 Cumberland Road, Bristol BS1 6UX.
from 1.30 – 5.00 FREE ENTRY. A Spike Island Open Studios event.

Dostoyevsky Wannabe goes to Bristol

Saturday 28th April.

Cat No: DW-412 Rough Trade Bristol, 2:30pm-4pm FREE
Event Type: Dual Dostoyevksy Wannabe book launch plus readings
Cities Guest Editor[s] (Bristol): Paul Hawkins

INFO: Official launch of BOTH Lou Ham:RAS and Dostoyevsky Wannabe Cities: Bristol. Featuring readings/work from: Sarer Scotthorne, David Turner, Vik Shirley, Clive Birnie, Lizzy Turner & Paul Hawkins (Lou Ham: RAS).
Two books on sale: Lou Ham: RAS by Paul Hawkins AND Dostoyevsky Wannabe Cities: Bristol [Edited by Paul Hawkins] both published by Dostoyevsky Wannabe.
Also, obviously Rough Trade records, books, + DW Bristol Cities pamphlet (contains work by all readers) & Lou Ham:RAS on sale

EVENT NEWS: All sorted. People of Bristol (and beyond), why not come along on the 28th April?
Location Details/Address: Rough Trade Bristol, 3 New Bridewell, Nelson Street, Bristol BS1 2QD
Drinks: Coffee, beer, soft drinks available to buy from Rough Trade cafe and bar.
Food: Nah

https://www.dostoyevskywannabe.com/cities/dw_cities_bristol

Synapse International

Great new journal of visual poetry HERE, guest edited by Philip Davenport and featuring: