The Dreamers

Ameena Anjum, Ameera Al-Aji, Andrea Berry, Emma Bolland, Luke Chapman, Helen Clarke, Louise Finney, Rebecca Jagoe, Sharon Kivland, John McDowall, Debbie Michaels, Rachel Smith, Rachel Taylor, Lunzhao Wu
ISBN 978-1-910055-29-8
MA BIBLIOTHÈQUE
130 mm x 190 mm, 148 pages, perfect-bound
£10.00 / 12 euros
‘Writing, Walking, Dreaming… Walking (literally and figuratively, one might say sleepwalking) is explored herein. Walking and dreaming provide ways of knowing a place. They lead to encounters with strangers and with ourselves. The city is the stage for autobiographical encounters; where houses and memories meet; where the uncanny is both home and away; where the stranger leads us down the rabbit hole. There are drifts through Jacques Lacan’s Seminar on ‘The Purloined Letter’ and Walter Benjamin’s ‘A Berlin Chronicle’; urban nightmares; the homesick child; enigmatic staircases; snapshots of the past and lost objects; reflections on writing; seeing words as images; and prophetic dreams. Amsterdam slips into a New York bar, and a dystopian group recounts its anxieties.’
You can buy  The Dreamers online here.

Verbose

Following a standing-room-only event in February, live literature night Verbose is back a week today, on Monday 27 March, at Fallow Café in Fallowfield, Manchester.

Hailed by the media as one of the best spoken word nights in Manchester, Verbose each month invites three headliners who share a link, be that a publisher or publication, a writing group or project, or a common writing-related place of work. This month, Verbose showcases three authors who are associated with the Centre for New Writing at the University of Manchester: Grace McCleen, Susan Barker and Beth Underdown.

Betty Trask Award-winner Grace McCleen is a writing fellow at the Centre for New Writing, author of three novels and former writer in residence at the Bronte Parsonage in Haworth. Jerwood Prize-winner Susan Barker teaches creative writing and is working on her fourth novel. Beth Underdown has just launched her debut, The Witchfinders’ Sister, to critical acclaim. She is a Lecturer in Creative Writing at the Centre for New Writing, which is headed up by renowned author of Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit, Jeanette Winterson.

Since its relaunch by prize-winning writer Sarah-Clare Conlon in January 2015, Verbose has welcomed many luminaries of the literature scene, including poets Richard Barrett, Anne Caldwell, Michael Conley and Rosie Garland, and prose writers Jenn Ashworth, Neil Campbell, Nicholas Royle and Emma Jane Unsworth. Man Booker Prize-listed authors Ian McGuire and Alison Moore have been guests, and February marked the launch of David Gaffney’s new novel All The Places I’ve Ever Lived. Upcoming events will feature Costa shortlistee Stephen May.

Taking place on the fourth Monday of the month at Fallow Café (2a Landcross Road, M14 6NA), entry is free and doors are at 7.30pm. See verbosemcr.wordpress.com. Open mic slots are three minutes; to perform, email via verbosemcr@gmail.com.

Walter Benjamin’s lost diagrams

In ‘A Berlin Chronicle’ (1932) Benjamin describes a lost diagram:
I was struck by the idea of drawing a diagram of my life, and I knew at the same moment exactly how it was to be done. With a very simple question I interrogated my past life, and the answers were inscribed, as if of their own accord, on a sheet of paper that I had with me. A year or two later, when I lost this sheet, I was inconsolable. I have never since been able to restore it as it arose before me then, resembling a series of family trees. Now, however, reconstructing its outline in thought without directly reproducing it, I should, rather, speak of a labyrinth. I am not concerned here with what is installed in the chamber at its enigmatic centre, ego or fate, but all the more with the many entrances leading to the interior. These entrances I call primal acquaintances; each of them is a graphic symbol of my acquaintance with a person whom I met, not through other people, but through neighbourhood, family relationships, school comradeship, mistaken identity, companionship on travels, or other such hardly numerous- situations. So many primal relationships, so many entrances to the maze. But since most of them—at least those that remain in our memory—for their part open up new acquaintances, relations to new people, after some time they branch off these corridors (the male may be drawn to the right, female to the left). Whatever cross connections are finally established between these systems also depends on the inter-twinements of our path through life.
Walter Benjamin, ‘A Berlin Chronicle’, 1932, in One-Way Street: And Other Writings, trans. by Edmund Jephcott and Kingsley Shorter, London: Verso, pp. 293–346
We are looking for submissions of diagrams in response to this description. A selection of submissions will be published by MA BIBLIOTHÈQUE in June 2017, and presented at MISS READ: Berlin Art Book Festival 2017, July, Haus der Kulturen der Welt. The book will include essays by Sam Dolbear and Christian Wollin with an introduction by Helen Clarke, and is edited by Helen Clarke and Sharon Kivland.
The publication will be a perfect bound paperback, page size 140 mm x 205 mm, portrait format. The scale of page must be considered when submitting: that is, as a double-page image in a landscape format, or single page portrait format. If submitting in landscape format ,please work to a page size of 205 mm x 280 mm and allow for a small gutter loss.
Submissions should be made to lostdiagrams@gmail.com. Only a single submission may be made. Please note that submissions must comply with the following in order to be considered:
• Image: black and white ONLY
• Image: sent as a TIFF
• Deadline of 31 March 2017 (midnight)
Applicants will be notified by 15 April 2017, if their submission has been selected for publication.
The editors and publisher very much regret that they are unable to offer a fee. Each contributor will receive a copy of the book.
The Lost Diagrams Facebook page can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/LostDiagrams/