Visual Poetry in Europe – Imago Mundi

A special collection, curated by the poet and artist Sarenco, that constitutes an original thematic digression from Imago Mundi’s traditional geographic groupings: 210 works by European artists and an extraordinary movement which, from the great Futurist revolution and its first appearance in the 1950s, continues to question the privilege granted to the exclusively verbal aspect of language.  Concentrated in the 10×12 cm format, the radiance of the text-image, instead of being diminished by the miniature form, appears to undergo a revival, driven by the imagination of the artists opening themselves to new spaces of iconic-poetic symbolism. Including Other Room performer Paula Claire. More here.

 

Karen Mac Cormack & Steve McCaffery in Sheffield

An evening poetry reading: Independent Publishers Book Fair, Sheffield

Saturday 10th June, 2017, Bank Street Arts, 32-40 Bank Street, Sheffield. S1 2DS  7:30pm, free entry.

Karen Mac Cormack is the author of more than a dozen books of poetry. Titles include Quirks & Quillets, The Tongue Moves Talk, At Issue, Vanity Release,TALE LIGHT: New & Selected Poems 1984–2009, and AGAINST WHITE (Veer Books, London, 2013). Her poems have appeared in such anthologies asMoving Borders, Out of Everywhere, Another Language, Prismatic Publics, and have been translated into French, Portuguese, Swedish and Norwegian. An extended interview with her appears in Scott Thurston’s Talking Poetics (Shearsman, 2011). Born in Zambia, of dual British/Canadian citizenship, she currently lives in the USA and teaches at the State University of New York at Buffalo.

Steve McCaffery has been twice nominated for Canada’s Governor General’s Award and is twice recipient of the American Gertrude Stein Prize for Innovative Writing. He is the author of over 40 books and chapbooks of poetry and criticism. An ample selection of his poetic explorations in numerous forms can be savoured in the two volumes of Seven Pages Missing (Coach House Press). As well as Panopticon, Tatterdemalion (Veer Books), Alice in Plunderland (Book Thug), Revanches (Xexoxial), and Parsival (Roof). His book-object-concept A Little Manual of Treason was commissioned for the 2011 Shajah Biennale in the United Arab Emirates. A founding member of the sound poetry ensemble Four Horsemen, TRG (Toronto Research Group) and the College of Canadian ”Pataphysics and long-time resident of Toronto he is now David Gray Professor of Poetry and Letters at the University at Buffalo. Born in Jessop’s Hospital Sheffield, he is listed, along with John Ruskin, Margaret Drabble, Eric Clapton and Patrick MacNee, as one of the top 100 people who were born or lived in that city.​

Sharon Kivland – READING NANA

READING NANA. An experimental novel, 2017

ISBN 978-1-910055-30-4
MA BIBLIOTHÈQUE,
140 mm x 205 mm, 104 pages, perfect-bound
£10.00

Emile Zola’s novel Nana is re-read and re-written,ghost-written, condensed according to soft furnishings, lighting effects (including metaphor), other women, death and dying, cats, anti-semitism, money, smell, and many other categories. More here.

Edge Poetics

Beds

A Symposium on Innovative and Speculative Creative Writing Practices in Higher Education

4th November 2017

10.00-17.30, with a public reading at 18.00

Venue: University of Bedfordshire, Luton Campus

With keynotes from Professor Robert Sheppard (Edge Hill University) and Nicholas Royle (Manchester Metropolitan University), and contributions from Dr Helen Marshall (Anglia Ruskin University) and Dr Daniel Watt (Loughborough University).

In the late essay, ‘Literature and Life’, Gilles Deleuze expands on ideas from his earlier work about the ways literary writing can open up ‘a kind of foreign language within language, which is neither another language nor a rediscovered patois, but a becoming-other of language, a minorization of this major language, a delirium that carries it off, a witch’s line that escapes the dominant system.’

Till relatively recently, Creative Writing in Higher Education has been dominated by a set of techniques and tropes derived from realism, and also by the expectations of mainstream literary fiction. Increasingly, however, aspects of innovative and speculative poetics are finding their way into the classroom.

This one-day symposium will ask: what are the benefits for the pedagogy of Creative Writing of writing practices drawn from experimental and fantastic traditions; and what does it mean to be a writer interested in such traditions who also teaches Creative Writing in academe?  Is there a value in teaching students to find the kind of delirium Deleuze writes of? It will bring together writers, teachers of Creative Writing, and others with an interest in the field, to discuss these questions.

Suggested topics for papers might include but are not limited to:

Creative Writing pedagogy and innovation; Creative Writing pedagogy and writing in genre; all forms of creative writing that work at the borders of genre in the Creative Writing classroom; blurred lines between theory and creative practice

Conference organisers Tim Jarvis, Keith Jebb, and Lesley McKenna (University of Bedfordshire) invite abstracts of 350 words for 20-minute papers; please submit along with a short biographical note, by 4th August 2017, to edgepoetics@gmail.com.