Myths of the Modern Woman

Sat, 30 Jan 2016 4.00 PM – 6.00 PM Tickets: £3/2 – Bluecoat, School Lane, Liverpool

 

Myths of the Modern Woman – an afternoon of readings and discussion curated by Sandeep Parmar, academic, poet and author of The Reading Mina Loy’s Autobiographies: Myth of the Modern Woman. The event features contributions from poets Zoe Skoulding, Sara Crangle, Joanne Ashcroft, Robert Sheppard and artist Melissa Gordon.

Parmar has programmed Myths of the Modern Women in response to Loy’s writing and to Melissa Gordon’s enduring fascination with Loy’s play ‘Collision’ (1916). Gordon’s exhibition Fallible Space, an installation determined by the script of ‘Collision’ provides the backdrop for the afternoon. The event will be introduced by Sandeep Parmar followed by poetry readings by Skoulding, Crangle, Ashcroft and Sheppard. The readings will be followed by a round table discussion and drinks in the Bluecoat bar.

Mina Loy (1882-1966) is recognised today as one of the most innovative modernist poets, numbering Gertrude Stein, Marcel Duchamp, Djuna Barnes and T.S. Eliot amongst her admirers.

About the Poets:

Robert Sheppard’s History or Sleep: Selected Poems has just been published by Shearsman, and showpieces work from the last 30 years. Last year he also published his ‘autrebiographies’ Words Out of Time and this yearThe Drop will appear from Oystercatcher. He is Professor of Poetry and Poetics at Edge Hill University, and is also a critic of contemporary poetry.

Sara Crangle is a Reader in English at the University of Sussex. She edited Mina Loy’s unpublished short prose works for a volume titled Stories and Essays of Mina Loy (Dalkey Archive Press 2010). She has published writing on Loy’s associates Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, Wyndham Lewis and members of Dada, and is currently working on a book with the working title, Mina Loy: Anatomy of a Sentient Satirist (forthcoming, Edinburgh University Press). She started her first book of poetry, Wild Ascending Lisp (Critical Documents 2008), whilst on a research trip to explore the Loy archive at Yale.

Zoë Skoulding is primarily a poet, though her work encompasses sound-based vocal performance, collaboration, translation, literary criticism, editing, and teaching creative writing. She lectures in the School of English at Bangor University, and has been Editor of the international quarterly Poetry Wales since 2008. Her recent collections of poems are The Museum of Disappearing Sounds (Seren, 2013), Remains of a Future City (Seren, 2008), long-listed for Wales Book of the Year 2009, and The Mirror Trade (Seren, 2004). Her collaborative publications include Dark Wires with Ian Davidson (West House Books, 2007) and From Here, with Simonetta Moro (Dusie, 2008). She is a member of the collective Parking Non-Stop, whose CD Species Corridor, combining experimental soundscape with poetry and song, was released on the German label Klangbad in 2008. You Will Live in Your Own Cathedral is a multimedia soundscape, video and poetry performance with Alan Holmes that has been presented across Europe in several languages.

Joanne Ashcroft has had poems published in journals, pamphlets, and in The Other Room anthology 2015. Her pamphlet Maps and Love Songs for Mina Loy won the Poetry Wales Purple Moose 2012 and is published by Seren. Most recently she has a collaborative work with Patricia Farrell, Conversational Nuisance available as a zimZalla object. Several of her ‘Charm’ poems can be read in the current edition of The Wolf and in Litter (online). Joanne is currently a research student at Edge Hill University, studying ‘sound and transformation’ in the work of three contemporary innovative poets.

Cardiff Poetry Experiment

Thursday, February 5, 2015
FRIDAY 13th FEBRUARY
Cardiff Poetry Experiment

Doors open at 7pm, readings promptly at 7:30pm
Free admission, followed by drinks and discussion

Butetown History and Arts Centre
4 Dock Chambers, Stryd Bute, Cardiff Bay

Featuring:
SMSteele
Cris Paul
Zoë Skoulding

SMSteele is a PhD researcher at Exeter, an installation artist and a widely published Canadian poet. She accompanied the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry as an official Canadian war artist – her country’s first poet to do so – from 2008-2010 on their road to war to Afghanistan. Suzanne is a founding member of eXegesis poetry collective, and librettist of the 270-person symphonic work, Afghanistan: Requiem for a Generation (2012). Her work has been broadcast internationally.

Cris Paul is a writer and artist from Wales, based in Caerphilly. His work could be described as ‘late modernist’, and through Bob Cobbing’s Writers Forum workshop, his time living in South America, his outlook was shaped enormously. His poetry, journalism, and criticism have been published widely in the Guardian as well as vital small press publications (Skald, Openned, Bad Press, Greatworks, Onedit). He has contributed to Wales Arts Review and Poetry Wales. His first book, Mantras for the City from the City, was published by Writers Forum and his second, Stenia Cultas Handbook, by Veer Books.

Zoë Skoulding is a poet, translator, editor and critic. She has published four collections of poetry, most recently The Museum of Disappearing Sounds (Seren, 2013), shortlisted for the Ted Hughes Award for New Work in Poetry, and Remains of a Future City (Seren, 2008). She has performed her work at many international festivals, often incorporating electronic sound in her readings as well as collaborating with musicians. Her monograph Contemporary Women’s Poetry and Urban Space: Experimental Cities was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2013, and she was editor of Poetry Wales from 2008-2014. She is a Senior Lecturer in the School of English at Bangor University.

Cabaret Hrabal

hrabal_vizual

 

One of the boundless figures of late 20th century Czech literature, Bohumil Hrabal was a novelist, a drinker, a bon vivant, an avant gardist, a railway dispatcher during the Nazi occupation, a traveling salesman, a steelworker, a recycling mill worker, a stagehand… His novels, which include Too Loud a Solitude, Closely Observed Trains, and I Served the King of England, were censored under the Communist regime, yet have since been translated into nearly thirty languages. A survivor of both the Nazi and Soviet occupations of Czechoslovakia, much of Hrabal’s work juxtaposes the darkness of history to the comic, human-scale happenings of the every-day. His oeuvre is as inimitable as his novels are unforgettable.

Through a half-dozen brand new commissions from some of the most exciting UK based poets, artists, conceptualists, theatre makers and dramaturges, Hrabal will be evoked and enveloped, transposed into some of the most exciting literary experimentalists of contemporary London.

Featuring Zoe Skoulding (sound poetry), Sarah Kelly (book sculptures), Joshua Alexander (film art), Stephen Emmerson (conceptual performance), Marcus Slease (poetry), Tom Jenks (literary experiments), Eva Danickova (stage reading) and Lucinka Eisler (theatre), this is a chance to discover, or rediscover, a great European writer through new and exciting works that pay their debt to the remarkable achievements of Hrabal in the essence of their happening.

Read more at the Czech Centre London site.

Lisa Robertson & Zoe Skoulding

Monday, 9th June, 18:00 F02, Firth Court, Western Bank

Free Entry. All are Welcome

Readings by Zoe Skoulding and Lisa Robertson followed by a Conversation with Lisa Robertson

Lisa Robertson is a Canadian poet now living in France.With Matthew Stadler she edited and annotated Revolution: A Reader, a 1200 page guide to how to live in the present. Her books include Debbie: An Epic and The Weather, both co-published in the UK by Reality Street Editions, a collection of essays Nilling (Bookthug, 2012), Occasional Work and Seven Walks from the Office for Soft Architecture (Coach House, 2004), Magenta Soul Whip (Coach House, 2009) and RE28099s Boat (University of California Press, 2010). Cinema of the Present is forthcoming from Coach House, and Enitharmon is to publish a new edition of The Men (Bookthug, 2006). She was the Bain Swigget visiting Lecturer in Poetry at Princeton University, and teaches in the MFA programme at Piet Zwart Institute in Rotterdam.

ZoeSkoulding is a poet, translator, editor and critic. She has published four collections of poetry, most recently The Museum of Disappearing Sounds (Seren, 2013) and Remains of a Future City (Seren, 2008), poems from which have been widely translated. She has performed her work at many international festivals, often incorporating electronic sound in her readings as well as collaborating with musicians. She is Senior Lecturer in the School of English at Bangor University.

Storm and Golden Sky

FRIDAY 25th April, Zoe Skoulding and Keston Sutherland

Up the stairs (at the back of the barroom) at the Caledonia pub, Catharine Street, in the Georgian Quarter, Liverpool, £4, 7 pm spot-on start!
Keston Sutherland is the author of The Odes to TL61P, Stupefaction, Stress Position, Hot White Andy and other books, and lots of essays, many of them about Marx and poetry. He lives in Brighton, where he runs the Sussex Poetry Festival, and where he founded Brighton Left Unity. He co-edits Barque press.
Zoë Skoulding is primarily a poet, though her work encompasses sound-based vocal performance, collaboration, translation, literary criticism, editing, and teaching creative writing. She lectures in the School of English at Bangor University, and has been Editor of the international quarterly Poetry Wales since 2008. Her recent collections of poems are The Museum of Disappearing Sounds (Seren, 2013), Remains of a Future City (Seren, 2008), long-listed for Wales Book of the Year 2009. You Will Live in Your Own Cathedral is a multimedia soundscape, video and poetry performance with Alan Holmes that has been presented across Europe in several languages.

Born of a Liverpool taste for variety and drama, ‘Storm and Golden Sky’ offers literary high style from across the poetic landscape. Programmed by a collective of Liverpool-based poets, Michael Egan, Nathan Jones, Robert Sheppard and Eleanor Rees.