Animal Waste

Animal Waste : The second of a set of five cinema-poetic collaborations with the artist-filmmaker Joshua Alexander.

Animal Waste spreads itself over the lands of London which seem to have inspired a re-understanding of the city’s literary and psychological history, from Limehouse to Wapping, Rotherhithe to Ratcliff. Mutely nodding to this profound and now taken for granted reexamination of these once were slums, Animal Waste sets itself against the confident and touristic glean of that history, instead aligning itself with the suffering sediment of the actual past. Shot around Wellclose Sq and Hawksmoor’s St Anne’s, and hiding from the Thames, the film evokes Falk, Swedenborg, Linneaus in all their intelligent menace.

‘Manichean visions revive disputed and despoiled London ground. Poetry in light and stone’ Iain Sinclair

The animal films explore the particular, baffled and morbid character of English attitudes to mortality, along with the specific influence of place and conformity on the quintessentially English deferral of emotion and melodrama. The films aim to capture the ambiguous menace of an often accidentally humorous resolve, manner, apology and understatement so prevalent in the English character.

Supported by the Eurimages TEM grant and Arts Council England via The Enemies Project.

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Aletta Ocean’s Alphabet Empire

“A book that asks, abstractly, are letters shaped like bodies? Can words evoke faces, captured in a screen? Who, or what, is assimilating, who or what? Aletta Ocean’s Alphabet Empire is a collection of art poems, hand wrought in black, grey, silver and white, fashioned with indian ink, paint and pen, worked with techniques that edge around writing, vying with abstraction, constantly harrying semantic meaning and legibility. 

Five years in the making, conceptually this is a book about sex, poetry and pornography and the disconnect between the former and the latter. These pages explore technology in its absence and aim to evidence the power of materiality and the body, and our hands, that are still required for touch.”

“Searching AOAE online (Aletta Ocean’s Alphabet Empire) shows a YouTube clip of Japanese cats mating. What’s a word in any case if not a monster? A monster that eats words. The toner explodes on the office carpet spilling out a perfectly formed oeuvre. Serifs skywrite like migrating gannets. The rorschach accidentally tells you what to think. The printed facsimile becomes original when the world goes JavaScript. The dollar sign is a duck walking backwards into a lake. The ATM dispenses glyphs. How do we know people have faces when they take the day off work? The tank rolls over the charcoal leaving a map of Iraq or a new version of Cathay. We’re back in the world of Artaud’s final journal where, thank fuck (and at last) we’re not being told what to think. Aletta Ocean’s Alphabet Empire is an almighty triumph, a well-earned relief. Picasso said it took a lifetime to learn to paint like a child. Or, for that matter, like the mad.” Chris McCabe

Part of Poem Brut, supported by Arts Council England. Available to purchase here – Aletta Ocean’s Alphabet Empire.

 

HARD TO READ – Collected Paint Poems, Poet Portraits & Pansemia of SJ FOWLER

Rich Mix Gallery 35-47 Bethnal Green Rd, London E1 6LA (downstairs from the Indigo Cafe) December 9th 2017 to january 14th 2018 with a special view performance event on January 13th 2018

.Collecting together the art poetry of SJ Fowler, this solo exhibition aims to pose several questions of the poem as a concrete, visual thing in the world. What is in the shape of a letter and what images do words recall? What is the meaning of colour in poetry and text upon the page, and white space? How does the situation of a poem change its meaning? Why is composition not a concept that applies to a medium that is innately visual? In literature, why has content overwhelmed context? Why has product dominated process? HARD TO READ poses these questions and answers them poorly, playfully, with over 40 original works drawn from multiple publications and previous exhibitions – works that interrogate handwriting, abstraction, illustration, asemic and pansemic writing, scribbling, crossings out, forgotten notes, strange scrawls – the odd interaction between paper and pen, and pencil, and coloured words that randomly collide with image recalling words.

The European Review of Poetry, Books and Culture

The European Review of Poetry, Books and Culture is an online literary journal, funded by the European Union, aiming to create an anglophone publication platform with a focus on continental Europe and world beyond.

Over 80 original essays, articles and reflections from writers across the world will be commissioned and published over the next 12 months. Initial commissions include new pieces by Rasha Abbas, Harry Man, Joanna Walsh, David Spittle, Christodoulos Makris, Andrew Gallix, Rocio Ceron, Catherine Humble and many more. New articles are soon to be published daily at www.versopolis.com