New reviews by Billy Mills

A number of new, short reviews are up at Billy Mills’ blog: the journals Reliquiæ from Corbel Stone Press and Uniformagazine from Uniform Books, as well as of derek beaulieu’s collection of essays and interviews, The Unbearable Contact with Poets, from if p then q press and poetry pamphlets by John McVey, Sarah Barnsley and James King.

derek beaulieu: The Unbearable Contact with Poets

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if p then q is very pleased to announce a new publication of reviews, essays and interviews by poet derek beaulieu. The edition is available at a snip of £5 or as a free pdf edition.

The Unbearable Contact with Poets, derek beaulieu’s second selection of essays and reviews, is essential reading. A keen and shrewd essayist, he marks himself out as one of the key commentators on contemporary concrete and conceptual poetry. The selection includes a substantial review of concrete poetry by women, an exploration into concrete and conceptual poetic representations of the holocaust, alongside interviews with Tony Trehy, Natalie Simpson and Gregory Betts, as well as lots more. The edition is available as a free pdf and as a perfect bound copy.

derek beaulieu is author of eight books of poetry (including a volume of his selected poetry entitled Please, No More Poetry), four volumes of conceptual fiction (most recently the short fiction collection Local Colour: ghosts, variations), 2 collections of critical writing and over 175 chapbooks, derek beaulieu’s work is consistently praised as some of the most radical and challenging in contemporary Canadian writing.

LINK to book’s page

Total Recall exhibition at Bury Art Gallery

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TOTAL RECALL 1 August — 3 October, 2015 

BURY ART MUSEUM

Moss St, Bury, Lancashire BL9 0DR, United Kingdom

How do you remember the people who are important to you? How do you conjure your shared past? Is it in an image, a sound, a smell, a touch? Or do you use words?

We invited world-leading poets and text-artists to make a language-memory for Tony Trehy, who has directed the internationally renowned Text Festival at Bury Art Museum since 2005. This exhibition celebrates a 10-year anniversary of the Festival and a 20-year anniversary of Tony’s time at Bury. Writing on a wall, an Internet search, a diary entry, a flurry of thoughts … what is remembering and who is it for?

Tony Trehy has been the ring-leader of decade-long conversations, new opportunities, challenges and heated debates. Each of his four Text Festivals has added to a continuing dialogue between language and art. Every Text Festival has asked the audience a simple-but-complex question: How do I read?

Into the historic space of Bury Art Museum, Trehy has injected text that is a new ‘language art’ for the 21st Century. Bury was once the centre of paper-making in Britain, now it is a pioneer of language-making, with its Text Archive welcoming readers from all over the world.

TOTAL RECALL is a guerrilla makeover, an A4 invasion of reading into the larger narrative of looking. Unlike the street signs outside, these are not corporate instructions or sales pitches; they are antidotes. Walls, vitrine, archival box—nary a “book” to be found, but a heap of language left in memory.

TOTAL RECALL includes work by local, national and international text-based artists and poets: angela rawlings, Alan Halsey, Barrie Tullett, Carolyn Thompson, Cecilie Bjørgås Jordheim, Darren Marsh, derek beaulieu, Emma Cocker, Eric Zboya, Erica Baum, Jaap Blonk, James Davies, Jayne Dyer, Jesse Glass, Karri Kokko, Kristen Mueller, Lawrence Weiner, Leanne Bridgewater, Liz Collini, Lucy Harvest Clarke, Marco Giovenale, Márton Koppány, Matt Dalby, Mike Chavez-Dawson, Paula Claire, Penny Anderson, Peter Jaeger, Philip Davenport, Rachel Defay-Liautard, Robert Grenier, Ron Silliman, Satu Kaikkonen, Sarah Sanders, Seekers of Lice, Stephen Emmerson, Steve Giasson, Steve Miller, Tom Jenks, and Tony Lopez.

— derek beaulieu and Phil Davenport, Curators

Tony Lopez on his work for the Bury Text Festival

 ‘Works on Paper’ was commissioned in 2008. I stayed in Manchester and spent a few days visiting Bury just finding out about the place, people and history, including the library and archive. Of course Bury is a prime site in the Industrial Revolution both in terms of technical innovation and its rapid economic development as a manufacturing centre. I was particularly interested in Bury’s later position in the early twentieth century as a world-leading producer of paper. This makes sense when you realise that industrial paper production came about as a kind of diversification of the cotton industry after much earlier breakthroughs in mechanical weaving, John Kay’s flying shuttle, programmed looms and so on. They had cotton waste and rags, water and then steam power; factories with highly trained mechanics and inventive engineers, and were very well placed to respond to the explosion of print culture.

Discover more HERE at the Text Archive Blog and site which also includes news and articles by derek beaulieu, Helen White, Richard Pinkney & Holly Pester