Noise in the Face of by David Buuck

NOISE IN THE FACE OF

new poems by David Buuck

Roof Books, NY, 2016.

http://www.spdbooks.org/Products/9781931824675/noise-in-the-face-of.aspx

I don’t know when I’ve ever read poetry more completely of and in the streets—where the form and content of the poetics of the march and occupation and riot are so thoroughly merged. Squelch that cop radio feedback, turn up the Michael Jackson—the livestream is on and in your hands, comrade. David Buuck has his razor sharp eye and ear at all times on “what / ’s beyond the shattered frame” of mere representational aes- thetics/politics: this is poetry bashed out on a burning piano as it hurtles downhill during an Oakland riot. I for one am more than a little excited to be along for the ride.   —Stephen Collis

David Buuck writes a history of the problem of being a poet inside the historical moment of a city which itself had become a poem. Oakland was once a messed-up erupting ambiguity of the negatively capable indecorously accessorizing, the messed-up positron of the all, but maybe what Oakland was also was the precipice overlooking Silicon Valley, a cliff geo-tagged as a protest taking the form of a funeral in the form of a dance you refuse to do: “Whose fuck ups? / Our fuck ups.” The meta-shards of mega-self-awareness that come after are a jewel on the radiant pavement of after that.    —Anne Boyer

David Buuck’s Noise in the Face Of is not a book exposing lies. It is about the labor of standing together in the face of the exposed and learning to be there for one another. There is Love here and there is a promise for enough of it, just stand in there and you know he is right. What an honor to be alive at the same time as this poet who is showing that there is so much more beyond the filth and conspiracy of politics.   —CAConrad

Tripwire 8

Tripwire 8, a special issue on Cities & Cultural Poetics, is now available.

Featuring 240 pages of work from Anne Boyer, Cecily Nicholson, Marie Buck, DH, Amy Balkin, Kaia Sand & Daniela Molnar, Ryan Eckes, Kim Hyesoon, Zarina, Scott Sørli, Michael Woods, Lucky Pierre, Grupo de Arte Callejero (trans. MR translation collective), Jonas Staal & Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei, Emma Cocker, Nancy Popp, Gonzalo Millan (trans. Annegret Nill), Dambudzo Marechera, Lucy Parsons, and a special feature from Oakland, featuring Oki Sogumi, Jill Richards, Lara Durback, Wendy Trevino, Joshua Clover, Mayakov+sky Platform, Jasper Bernes, Emji Spero, Kate Robinson, and more.

David Buuck at Birkbeck

Reading and conversation with David Buuck

David will read work that comes directly out of thinking about Occupy Oakland & its more militant actions/offshoots/confrontations, put into context with broader questions about poetics and how Bay Area (& other North American) poet-activists are beginning to (re)think-through the always tangled questions of poetry/politics/etc.

7-9 pm
Wednesday 18th December
Room G 16
Birkbeck College, Main Building, Torrington Square

David Buuck is a writer who lives in Oakland, CA. He is the founder of BARGE, the Bay Area Research Group in Enviro-aesthetics, and co-founder and editor of Tripwire, a journal of poetics. An Army of Lovers, co-written with Juliana Spahr, is forthcoming from City Lights this fall, and SITE CITE CITY will be out from Futurepoem in 2014. Some publications, writing & performance samples, etc. available via davidbuuck.com

An Army of Lovers

Juliana Spahr, David Buuck, City Lights Publishers.

A picaresque experimental novel, An Army of Lovers is the story of Demented Panda and Koki, two friends trying to be political poets in a time when poetry has lost its ability to effect social change. Their collaboration unleashes a torrent of consumerist excess that morphs into a Gitmo-style torture camp. Our heroes struggle to avoid complicity in the spectacle, yet are unable to overcome it through poetry. Instead it invades their bodies, manifesting itself through blisters and other symptoms, as the poets attempt to move beyond this impasse. Absurdist, fantastic, conceptual, Army is a novel for the Occupy generation.