New Hix Eros review

Hix Eros: Poetry Review is published jointly by Sad Press and Hi Zero.

The latest issue is #8, published in March 2018, covering work by Sean Bonney, Lisa Robertson, Linda Kemp, Lila Matsumoto, Jennifer Pike Cobbing, Mike Saunders, Holly Pester et al., Sarah Hayden, Nicky Melville, Sophie Mayer, Calum Gardner, Juha Virtanen, Jèssica Pujol, Millie Guille, Sophie Seita, Caitlín Doherty, Corina Copp, Eleanor Perry, Daisy Lafarge, Vala Thorrods, JH Prynne, Colin Herd, and Peter Manson.



Poem Talk on Sean Bonney’s Happiness

The 122nd monthly episode of the podcast series “PoemTalk”—a discussion of Sean Bonney’s “Happiness” with Stephen Willey, Anna Strong Safford, and Luke Roberts.

You can subscribe to PoemTalk through iTunes — or here.

10 years of if p then q

Another big night in the not too distant future from James Davies’ publishing house if p then q. Wang it in your diary.

if p then q 10 years poster


Chris McCabe – The Nevermore: In Search of the Lost Poets of Abney Park

The Nevermore:
In Search of the Lost Poets
of Abney Park
Wednesday 21st March 7.30pm

To celebrate World Poetry Day, Poet and writer Chris McCabe turns the focus of his ongoing project about the Magnificent Seven cemeteries to the natural non-conformist landscape for poets: Abney Park Cemetery. Author of In the Catacombs: A Summer Among the Dead Poets of West Norwood Cemetery and Cenotaph South: Mapping the Lost Poets of Nunhead CemeteryMcCabe will present accounts of the dead and read a mix of poems from the poets he’s discovered along his journey so far, including those buried in Abney Park. You’ll hear about the poet-couple George Linnaeus Banks and Isabella Varley Banks and Emily Bowes, whose final words were “I shall walk with him in white”. The event will end with a Q and A and a chance to buy McCabe’s cemetery books.

To be held inside Abney Park’s chapel.

Please arrive at the main gates on Stoke newington High St between 7 & 7.20pm

18yrs and over.

Tickets: Full £12 / Conc £10
Book here
020 7275 7557


Summer Poetry School course with James Davies

Archiving Your Self Yourself: Quantified Self Studio

At a time in which we are archived by others, often through digital means, it seems more and more important to attempt to define ourselves – on our own terms – as individuals and as members of a diverse range of groups. Written attentively, poetry that archives the self is subversive and can present radically different narratives to those purported by digital and mass media. By using methods such as diaries and collation of information one can conduct a close examination of the self as it stands, now and then, to see how it fits into the bigger picture.

Read more about this short online course HERE


Contraband Live – David Miller’s Spiritual Letters

CONTRABAND LIVE – February 27th 2018

Contraband Live Launch of David Miller’s ‘Spiritual Letters’!!

With readings from Spiritual Letters by David Miller, April Fredrick, Steve Torrance and Matt Martin.

There will be more poetry and performance from Fran Lock, Michael Zand and Karen Sandhu.

A very exciting event!

Entry to the event is free and food is available from the venue.

Contraband Books and publications by other publishers will be on sale at our book stall. We look forward to seeing you there!

Monday 730-11pm | The Crown Tavern, 43 Clerkenwell Green, EC1R 0EG



Animal Waste

Animal Waste : The second of a set of five cinema-poetic collaborations with the artist-filmmaker Joshua Alexander.

Animal Waste spreads itself over the lands of London which seem to have inspired a re-understanding of the city’s literary and psychological history, from Limehouse to Wapping, Rotherhithe to Ratcliff. Mutely nodding to this profound and now taken for granted reexamination of these once were slums, Animal Waste sets itself against the confident and touristic glean of that history, instead aligning itself with the suffering sediment of the actual past. Shot around Wellclose Sq and Hawksmoor’s St Anne’s, and hiding from the Thames, the film evokes Falk, Swedenborg, Linneaus in all their intelligent menace.

‘Manichean visions revive disputed and despoiled London ground. Poetry in light and stone’ Iain Sinclair

The animal films explore the particular, baffled and morbid character of English attitudes to mortality, along with the specific influence of place and conformity on the quintessentially English deferral of emotion and melodrama. The films aim to capture the ambiguous menace of an often accidentally humorous resolve, manner, apology and understatement so prevalent in the English character.

Supported by the Eurimages TEM grant and Arts Council England via The Enemies Project.